marin 2014 group photo

Greenheart @ Marin Natural Propulsion Seminar (March 17-18)

marin 2014 group photo

Cheers to the most excellent people of the Marin Seminar! (Gavin’s 4th from the right for the curious.)

Greenheart was please to enjoy the opportunity to speak at the Marin Natural Propulsion Seminar in mid-March.

(For any yanks like me out there, that’s the MAritime Research Institute of the Netherlands — no relation to the Marin County of San Francisco Bay Area.) 

Representative-and-presenter Gavin reports that it was wonderful and enlightening to be surrounded by specialists in maritime renewable energy propulsion. He is (and we are) thankful for the interest showed in Greenheart’s target audience, our design criteria and choices, and how far the project has gotten so far.

The folks at Marin do amazing work, and it was our honor to have the chance to speak at this most interesting conference. If you have as much interest in renewable propulsion as we do, so please check out past conferences summaries here (2013) and here (2012)!

new dag van de

Greenheart runner up in Royal Dutch Engineering Association Prize!

Greenheart represents at Vernuftling Prize award ceremony

Greenheart represents at Vernuftling Prize award ceremony

We at Greenheart have been filled with enthusiastic anticipation over the past few weeks. The famous Vernuftling Prize was awarded just a few days ago in Holland by the Royal Dutch Engineering Association, and we were flush with excitement promoting it, asking the public and our supporters to go to the website and scan through the other marvelous ideas, and possibly vote for…US!

A portion of the judging was achieved through public Internet voting, and weight was also given to the choice of a panel of judges. This annual prize is for innovative engineering, and this year, our friend Gert Schouwstra at AAPlanadvies arranged our entry into the competition. Greenheart was auspiciously selected to be among the ten finalists, which was an honor in itself. Gert stayed out front on the publicity effort as he handled all the Dutch press, outreach and translation.

Gert interviewed on Greenheart nomination

Gert interviewed on Greenheart nomination

Evidently, the judges were favorably impressed by the ‘open-source’ collaborative design, which is not protected by patents in order to encourage speedy dissemination of the Greenheart concept, and expedite shipbuilding. The distinction of getting into the finals has been a good opportunity to congratulate the many contributors, collaborators and advisers who have helped shape the ship through the design process.

Let’s name our engineers again here to keep the kudos flowing!

Kunikata Seiichi of Greenheart has to go first. He has been pivotal in the design from the start. His skills and training as an engineer, heart of an artist, and agile hand of an experienced illustrator, have guided the evolution from raw idea through to the present design. Prof. Takeshi Kinoshita of Tokyo University has been our Technical Adviser from early on, and his intuition and expertise have been invaluable. He introduced Haruhiko Kaku to the project, and the key plan and basic naval architecture came from Kaku’s desk and his sailor’s sea sense. Electrical schematics and advice came from Don Claudio Fonsatti, Prof. Leo Setti, Freddy Toia and others at EngineeerAid. Preben Kristensen of the Dragon Project (Dragon Project PDF) has also been very generous with advice and practical expertise since he is building a concept super yacht along similar principles. The technical department at Upsolor and Sovello, our PV sponsors were also very helpful. In house (on board?) engineers include Florent Violain of Nantes, France who has also helped recruit even more fine assistance to the project. Tristan False (his true name) has been working on the water and waste systems, the peeps from Greenflow2358, Vincent Jacob and Thomas Carriot did the fluid dynamics calculations and are working on propeller design, and Bruno Lemunier is the talent behind the latest simplified A-frame rig design.

Peter Schenzle of Hamburg has been generous with his deep experience and wisdom in the sailing ship field. His encouragement and advice has been critical. Jan Heise of Poland was helpful with rig ideas, too. I should mention Freddy Toia again, since he is actively serving as engineer on a working vessel, El Esperanza, and has found time to contribute ideas and important data. Finally we owe gratitude and praise to Md. Badrul Alam of Western Marine Shipyards in Chittagong, who is doing the lion’s share of the ongoing engineering, and detailed design of the General Arrangement* plan of the ship, construction drawings. He is also our liaison to the shipyard where all of these plans will soon be transformed into steel and PV glass.

These people, and the many who have sent comments and advice via the website and especially through our Open Design Forum, also have our appreciation and deserve a share of the recognition, credit, and thanks. This has truly been a team effort, and not only our Greenheart team, but a sampling of clever minds and generous dispositions from around the world. We are truly grateful and hope to have all of our team on board before too long to enjoy the realization of their concepts and calculations.

In the end, we didn’t win, but we didn’t lose either. The way I understand it, our ship came in second place in the public voting, and received honorable mention from the expert panel of judges. Here is the report from the jury:

Greenheart receives second place in the public vote and honorable mention for Vernuftling Prize

Greenheart receives second place in the public vote and honorable mention for Vernuftling Prize

The first project that the jury would bring under attention is Greenheart, by AA-Planavies. It involves the design of a small cargo boat, propelled by sail and solarpower, thanks to the shallow draft it is appropriate to more or beach anywhere. The ship is designed for providing shuttle services between islands in the Pacific Ocean, wherethe population is generally not strong enough to exploit conventional transport. The jury considers it a heartwarming project that can actually contribute to improving the standard of living on the islands. What makes this project extra special is that it is has been developed open source, precisely aimed to achieve a cheap, and well suitable for the purpose, design All this is for the jury reason this project to grant an honorable judges acknowledgement.

Gavin Allwright, our commercial director, was present at the awards ceremony to receive our bouquet of flowers and give a short speech.

We are happy and delighted to have had this opportunity to showcase our work in the Netherlands, and look forward to splashing through Dutch waters and tying up on a canal or two.

Gert and Gavin at Vernuftling Prize Ceremony

Gert and Gavin at Vernuftling Prize Ceremony

* “The general arrangement of a ship can be defined as the assignment of spaces for all the required functions and equipments, properly coordinated for location and access. The requirements that must be met are, a) Volume requirements; b) Adequate trim and stability; c) Structural integrity; d) Watertight subdivision and integrity; and e) Adequate access to spaces. The volume below deck is subdivided into: a) Machinery space; b) Cargo spaces; c) Ballast spaces; d) Pump room; and e) Slop Tank.” “Chapter 5” of Department of Ship technology, CUSAT, B.Tech (NA&SB, Batch – XXIX) p. 86